1. Rapid tree carbon stock recovery in managed Amazonian forests

    Current Biology 25(20):2738 (2015)

  2. Rapid tree carbon stock recovery in managed Amazonian forests.

    Current Biology 25(18):R787 (2015) PMID 26394096

    While around 20% of the Amazonian forest has been cleared for pastures and agriculture, one fourth of the remaining forest is dedicated to wood production. Most of these production forests have been or will be selectively harvested for commercial timber, but recent studies show that even soon af...
  3. Determining the optimal harvest cycle for copaíba (Copaifera spp.) oleoresin production

    Agricultural Systems 131:116 (2014)

    • The optimal harvesting cycle of copaíba oleoresin is unknown. • Either maximizing NPV or oil production, the optimal cycle for copaíba is three years. ...
  4. Forest biomass recovery after conventional and reduced-impact logging in Amazonian Brazil

    Forest Ecology and Management 314:59 (2014)

    • Logging-induced biomass losses were greater in the plot under CL than RIL. • By 16years post-logging, the RIL plot recovered 100% of its original ABG biomass. ...
  5. Community loggers attempting to legalize traditional timber harvesting in the Brazilian Amazon: An endless path

    Forest Policy and Economics 50 (2013)

    We conducted a case study to analyze the challenges experienced by small loggers in implementing a Community Forest Management (CFM) model demanded by external environmental agencies. The case study was undertaken within traditional communities located in Boa Vista do Ramos County, Ama...
  6. Soil-mediated effects on potentialEuterpe edulis(Arecaceae) fruit and palm heart sustainable management in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    Forest Ecology and Management 284:78 (2012)

    Highlights ► Sodium and potassium played a key role in Euterpe edulis fruit and palm heart yield. ► Restinga populations would not be suitable for fruits and palm heart management. ► A habitat-specific approach of sustainable management is needed for E. edulis. ► General mode...
  7. The sustainability of timber production from Eastern Amazonian forests

    Land Use Policy 29(2):339 (2012)

    Highlights ► Brazil is implementing an ambitious program of forest concessions in the Amazon region. ► We examine whether existing regulations combined with best practices ensure sustained timber yields. ► Reduced impact logging is shown to be profitable and increase the timber availab...
  8. A Model for comparing reduced impact logging with conventional logging for an Eastern Amazonian Forest

    Forest Ecology and Management 260(11):2002 (2010)

    Research highlights ▶ The model captures the dynamic effects of harvest on tropical forest structure and composition. ▶ A stand logged according to Brazilian management requirements will require well over 120 years to recover its initial commercial volume, regardless of logging techniq...
  9. How rare is too rare to harvest?:Management challenges posed by timber species occurring at low densities in the Brazilian Amazon

    Forest Ecology and Management 256(7):1443 (2008)

    Tropical forests are characterized by diverse assemblages of plant and animal species compared to temperate forests. Corollary to this general rule is that most tree species, whether valued for timber or not, occur at low densities (<1 adult tree ha −1) or may be loc...
  10. What loggers leave behind: Impacts on big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) commercial populations and potential for post-logging recovery in the Brazilian Amazon

    Forest Ecology and Management 255(2):269 (2008)

    The sustainability of current harvest practices for high-value Meliaceae can be assessed by quantifying logging intensity and projecting growth and survival by post-logging populations over anticipated intervals between harvests. From 100%-area inventories of big-leaf mahogany ( Swiet...
  11. Evaluating ipê (Tabebuia, Bignoniaceae) logging in Amazonia: Sustainable management or catalyst for forest degradation?

    Biological Conservation 141(8):2071 (2008)

    Prized for their dense, rot-resistant wood, Tabebuia impetiginosa and T. serratifolia (vernacular name = ipê) are among the most valuable Amazonian timbers. We analyzed the geographical extent, spread and trajectory of ipê logging in Brazilian Amazonia, and evaluat...
  12. Beyond reaping the first harvest: management objectives for timber production in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Conservation Biology 21(4):916 (2007) PMID 17650242

    Millions of hectares of future timber concessions are slated to be implemented within large public forests under the forest law passed in 2006 by the Brazilian Congress. Additional millions of hectares of large, privately owned forests and smaller areas of community forests are certified as well...
  13. Adaptation of a spatially explicit individual tree-based growth and yield model and long-term comparison between reduced-impact and conventional logging in eastern Amazonia, Brazil

    Forest Ecology and Management 243(2):187 (2007)

    Timber logging is one of the main land uses in the Brazilian Amazon. Despite its recognized potential as a sustainable activity, logging is generally conducted in an unsustainable or predatory manner, with significant negative environmental impact. There is increasing pressure to adopt more...
  14. Improving spatial distribution estimation of forest biomass with geostatistics: A case study for Rondônia, Brazil

    Ecological Modelling 205(1):221 (2007)

    Mapping aboveground forest biomass is of fundamental importance for estimating CO 2 emissions due to land use and land cover changes in the Brazilian Amazon. However, existing biomass maps for this region diverge in terms of the total biomass estimates derived, as well as in the spati...
  15. Identifying bias in stand-level growth and yield estimations: A case study in eastern Brazilian Amazonia

    Forest Ecology and Management 236(2):127 (2006)

    Commercial volume increment based on permanent plot data has frequently been used to determine cutting cycles and logging intensities that do not deplete forest timber resources, and that are therefore compatible with sustainable forest management. We evaluate three potential sources of inc...
  16. Costs and benefits of forest management for timber production in eastern Amazonia

    Forest Ecology and Management 108(1):9 (1998)

    Rain forest logging is spreading in eastern Amazonia, and logging practices are careless, resulting in much unnecessary damage. We considered the technical feasibility, efficiency and profitability of `best' logging practices in this region by comparing planned and unplanned logging operati...
  17. Vine management for reduced-impact logging in eastern Amazonia

    Forest Ecology and Management 98(2):105 (1997)

    The presence of vines interconnecting the canopies of tropical forest trees has been thought to increase the damage to neighboring trees when a tree is felled during selective logging, resulting in larger canopy gaps and possibly prejudicting future timber harvests. To ameliorate this probl...