1. Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf star.

    Nature 480(7377):344 (2011) PMID 22170680

    Type Ia supernovae have been used empirically as 'standard candles' to demonstrate the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of their progenitor systems and how the stars explode, remain a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf ...
  2. The metamorphosis of supernova SN 2008D/XRF 080109: a link between supernovae and GRBs/hypernovae.

    Science 321(5893):1185 (2008) PMID 18653846

    The only supernovae (SNe) to show gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or early x-ray emission thus far are overenergetic, broad-lined type Ic SNe (hypernovae, HNe). Recently, SN 2008D has shown several unusual features: (i) weak x-ray flash (XRF), (ii) an early, narrow optical peak, (iii) disappearance of t...
  3. Asphericity in supernova explosions from late-time spectroscopy.

    Science 319(5867):1220 (2008) PMID 18239091

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are the explosions that announce the death of massive stars. Some CC-SNe are linked to long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and are highly aspherical. One important question is to what extent asphericity is common to all CC-SNe. Here we present late-time spectr...
  4. A neutron-star-driven X-ray flash associated with supernova SN 2006aj.

    Nature 442(7106):1018 (2006) PMID 16943833

    Supernovae connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hyper-energetic explosions resulting from the collapse of very massive stars ( approximately 40 M\circ, where M\circ is the mass of the Sun) stripped of their outer hydrogen and helium envelopes. A very massive progenitor, colla...
  5. An asymmetric energetic type Ic supernova viewed off-axis, and a link to gamma ray bursts.

    Science 308(5726):1284 (2005) PMID 15919986

    Type Ic supernovae, the explosions after the core collapse of massive stars that have previously lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes, are particularly interesting because of their link with long-duration gamma ray bursts. Although indications exist that these explosions are aspherical, dire...
  6. A very energetic supernova associated with the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):847 (2003) PMID 12815425

    Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-the most luminous of all astronomical explosions-signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. This evidence was originally based on the probable association of one unusual GRB with a supernov...