1. Gastrointestinal and liver disease in Adult Life After Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia: A population-based cohort study.

    International Journal of Cancer 139(7):1501 (2016) PMID 27194488

    Survival after childhood cancer diagnosis has remarkably improved, but emerging evidence suggests that cancer-directed therapy may have adverse gastrointestinal late effects. We aimed to comprehensively assess the frequency of gastrointestinal and liver late effects among childhood cancer surviv...
  2. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS).

    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 75(9):1622 (2016) PMID 26555403

    The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries. From the nati...
  3. Long-term risk of renal and urinary tract diseases in childhood cancer survivors: A population-based cohort study.

    European Journal of Cancer 64:52 (2016) PMID 27328451

    Childhood cancer has been associated with long-term risk of urinary tract diseases, but risk patterns remain to be comprehensively investigated. We analysed the lifetime risk of urinary tract diseases in survivors of childhood cancer in the Nordic countries. We identified 32,519 one-year survivo...
  4. Occupation and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Nordic Countries.

    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 58(8):e301 (2016) PMID 27294445

    The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of bladder cancer incidence according to occupational categories in the Nordic countries. The study cohort comprised 15 million individuals older than 30 years who participated in one or more population censuses in 1960, 1970, 1980/1981, and...
  5. Perceived physical strain at work and incidence of colorectal cancer: A nested case-control study.

    Cancer Epidemiology 43:100 (2016) PMID 27420632

    The evidence for a relationship between colon cancer incidence and physical activity is not fully convincing, and the association between physical activity and rectal cancer is also unclear. We studied the association between perceived physical workload (PPWL) at work and colorectal cancer, stra...
  6. Insertion of an SVA-E retrotransposon into the CASP8 gene is associated with protection against prostate cancer.

    Human Molecular Genetics 25(5):1008 (2016) PMID 26740556 PMCID PMC4754045

    Transcriptional and splicing anomalies have been observed in intron 8 of the CASP8 gene (encoding procaspase-8) in association with cutaneous basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) and linked to a germline SNP rs700635. Here, we show that the rs700635[C] allele, which is associated with increased risk of BC...
  7. Intracellular location of BRCA2 protein expression and prostate cancer progression in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Cohort.

    Carcinogenesis 37(3):262 (2016) PMID 26775038

    Prostate cancer patients with inherited BRCA2 mutations have a survival disadvantage. However, it is unknown whether progression is associated with BRCA2 protein expression in diagnostic prostate cancer tissue, among men without inherited mutations. We conducted a nested case-control study withi...
  8. The Adult Life After Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS) Study: Design and Characteristics.

    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 62(12):2204 (2015) PMID 26193842

    During the last five decades, survival of childhood cancer has increased from 25% to 80%. At the same time, however, it has become evident that survivors experience a broad range of therapy-related late adverse health effects. The aim of the Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiC...
  9. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair.
    Felix R Day, Katherine S Ruth, Deborah J Thompson, Kathryn Lunetta, Natalia Pervjakova, Daniel I Chasman, Lisette Stolk, Hilary K Finucane, Patrick Sulem, Brendan Bulik-Sullivan, Tõnu Esko, Andrew D Johnson, Cathy Elks, Nora Franceschini, Chunyan He, Elisabeth Altmaier, Jennifer A Brody, Lude Franke, Jennifer E Huffman, Margaux F Keller, Patrick F McArdle, Teresa Nutile, Eleonora Porcu, Antonietta Robino, Lynda M Rose, Ursula M Schick, Jennifer A Smith, Alexander Teumer, Michela Traglia, Dragana Vuckovic, Jie Yao, Wei Zhao, Eva Albrecht, Najaf Amin, Tanguy Corre, Hottenga, Massimo Mangino, Albert V Smith, Toshiko Tanaka, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Irene L Andrulis, Hoda Anton-Culver, Antonis C Antoniou, Volker Arndt, Alice M Arnold, Caterina Barbieri, Matthias W Beckmann, Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel, Javier Benitez, Leslie Bernstein, Suzette J Bielinski, Carl Blomqvist, Eric Boerwinkle, Natalia V Bogdanova, Stig E Bojesen, Manjeet K Bolla, Anne-Lise Borresen-Dale, Thibaud S Boutin, Hiltrud Brauch, Hermann Brenner, Thomas Brüning, Barbara Burwinkel, Archie Campbell, Harry Campbell, Stephen J Chanock, J Ross Chapman, Yii-Der Ida Chen, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Fergus J Couch, Andrea D Coviello, Angela Cox, Kamila Czene, Hatef Darabi, Immaculata De Vivo, Ellen W Demerath, Joe Dennis, Peter Devilee, Thilo Dörk, Isabel, Alison M Dunning, John D Eicher, Peter A Fasching, Jessica D Faul, Jonine Figueroa, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Ilaria Gandin, Melissa E Garcia, Montserrat García-Closas, Graham Giles, Giorgia Girotto, Mark S Goldberg, Anna González-Neira, Mark O Goodarzi, Megan L Grove, Daniel F Gudbjartsson, Pascal Guénel, Xiuqing Guo, Christopher A Haiman, Per Hall, Ute Hamann, Brian E Henderson, Lynne J Hocking, Albert Hofman, Georg Homuth, Maartje J Hooning, John L Hopper, Frank B Hu, Jinyan Huang, Keith Humphreys, David J Hunter, Anna Jakubowska, Samuel E Jones, Maria Kabisch, David Karasik, Julia A Knight, Ivana Kolcic, Charles Kooperberg, Veli-Matti Kosma, Jennifer Kriebel, Vessela Kristensen, Diether Lambrechts, Claudia Langenberg, Jingmei Li, Xin Li, Sara Lindström, Yongmei Liu, Jian'an Luan, Jan Lubinski, Reedik Mägi, Arto Mannermaa, Judith Manz, Sara Margolin, Jonathan Marten, Nicholas G Martin, Corrado Masciullo, Alfons Meindl, Kyriaki Michailidou, Evelin Mihailov, Lili Milani, Roger L Milne, Martina Müller-Nurasyid, Michael Nalls, Benjamin M Neale, Heli Nevanlinna, Patrick Neven, Anne B Newman, Børge G Nordestgaard, Janet E Olson, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Paolo Peterlongo, Ulrike Peters, Astrid Petersmann, Julian Peto, Paul D Pharoah, Nicola Pirastu, Ailith Pirie, Giorgio Pistis, Ozren Polasek, David Porteous, Bruce M Psaty, Katri Pylkäs, Paolo Radice, Leslie J Raffel, Fernando Rivadeneira, Igor Rudan, Anja Rudolph, Daniela Ruggiero, Cinzia F Sala, Serena Sanna, Elinor J Sawyer, David Schlessinger, Marjanka K Schmidt, Frank Schmidt, Rita K Schmutzler, Minouk J Schoemaker, Robert A Scott, Caroline M Seynaeve, Jacques Simard, Rossella Sorice, Melissa C Southey, Doris Stöckl, Konstantin Strauch, Anthony Swerdlow, Kent D Taylor, Unnur Thorsteinsdottir, Amanda E Toland, Ian Tomlinson, Thérèse Truong, Laufey Tryggvadottir, Stephen Turner, Diego Vozzi, Qin Wang, Melissa Wellons, Gonneke Willemsen, James F Wilson, Robert Winqvist, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Alan F Wright, Drakoulis Yannoukakos, Tatijana Zemunik, Wei Zheng, Marek Zygmunt, Sven Bergmann, Dorret I Boomsma, Julie E Buring, Luigi Ferrucci, Grant W Montgomery, Vilmundur Gudnason, Tim D Spector, Cornelia M van Duijn, Behrooz Z Alizadeh, Marina Ciullo, Laura Crisponi, Douglas F Easton, Paolo Gasparini, Christian Gieger, Tamara B Harris, Caroline Hayward, Sharon L R Kardia, Peter Kraft, Barbara McKnight, Andres Metspalu, Alanna C Morrison, Alex P Reiner, Paul M Ridker, Jerome I Rotter, Daniela Toniolo, André G Uitterlinden, Sheila Ulivi, Henry Völzke, Nicholas J Wareham, David R Weir, Laura M Yerges-Armstrong, Alkes L Price, Kari Stefansson, Jenny A Visser, Ken Ong, Jenny, Joanne Murabito, John R B Perry, and Anna Murray

    Nature Genetics 47(11):1294 (2015) PMID 26414677 PMCID PMC4661791

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural meno...
  10. Risk of familial classical Hodgkin lymphoma by relationship, histology, age, and sex: a joint study from five Nordic countries.

    Blood 126(17):1990 (2015) PMID 26311361

    We aimed to provide the familial risk of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) by relationship, histology, age at diagnosis, and sex. A cohort of 57,475 first-degree relatives of 13,922 HL patients diagnosed between 1955 and 2009 in 5 European countries was observed for HL incidence. The overall lifet...
  11. Physical Activity from Early Adulthood and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A 24-Year Follow-Up Study among Icelandic Men.

    Cancer Prevention Research 8(10):905 (2015) PMID 26152935

    Physical activity in adult life may reduce prostate cancer risk. Data are scarce on the role of activity during early adulthood, as well as combined recreational and occupational physical activity on prostate cancer risk and mortality. We undertook a prospective study of 8,221 Icelandic men (bor...
  12. Cardiovascular disease in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia: A population-based cohort study of 32,308 one-year survivors.

    International Journal of Cancer 137(5):1176 (2015) PMID 25648592

    The lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease in a large cohort of childhood cancer survivors has not been fully assessed. In a retrospective population-based cohort study predicated on comprehensive national health registers, we identified a cohort of 32,308 one-year survivors of cancer diagnose...
  13. Loss-of-function variants in ATM confer risk of gastric cancer.

    Nature Genetics 47(8):906 (2015) PMID 26098866

    Gastric cancer is a serious health problem worldwide, with particularly high prevalence in eastern Asia. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Asian populations have identified several loci that associate with gastric cancer risk. Here we report a GWAS of gastric cancer in a European populat...
  14. Cancer Risk in Relatives of Testicular Cancer Patients by Histology Type and Age at Diagnosis: A Joint Study from Five Nordic Countries.

    European Urology 68(2):283 (2015) PMID 25913387

    None of the population-based epidemiologic studies to date has had a large enough sample size to show the familial risk of testicular cancer (TC) by age at diagnosis for patients and their relatives or for rare histologic subtypes. To estimate absolute and relative risks of TC in relatives of TC...
  15. Occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and electrical shocks and acute myeloid leukemia in four Nordic countries.

    Cancer Causes & Control 26(8):1079 (2015) PMID 25971677

    We studied the association between occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) and electrical shocks and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the Nordic Occupational Cancer cohort (NOCCA). We included 5,409 adult AML cases diagnosed between 1961 and 2005 in Finland, Icel...
  16. Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine.

    Clinical and Vaccine Immunology 22(8):943 (2015) PMID 26084514 PMCID PMC4519713

    This quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV6, -11, -16, and -18) vaccine long-term follow-up (LTFU) study is an ongoing extension of a pivotal clinical study (FUTURE II) taking place in the Nordic region. The LTFU study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safet...
  17. Occupation and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma: The Nordic Occupational Cancer Study.

    International Journal of Cancer 137(3):590 (2015) PMID 25557854

    To assess associations between occupation and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC), data from the Nordic Occupational Cancer Study, a large population-based cohort with long-term follow-up, was used. The Nordic Occupational Cancer Study includes 12.9 million ...
  18. Childhood cancer survivor cohorts in Europe.

    Acta Oncologica 54(5):655 (2015) PMID 25813473

    With the advent of multimodality therapy, the overall five-year survival rate from childhood cancer has improved considerably now exceeding 80% in developed European countries. This growing cohort of survivors, with many years of life ahead of them, has raised the necessity for knowledge concern...
  19. Cancer incidence among waiters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

    Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 43(2):204 (2015) PMID 25564114

    To study cancer risk patterns among waiters in the Nordic countries. We identified a cohort of 16,134 male and 81,838 female waiters from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the follow-up period from 1961 to 2005, we found that 19,388 incident cancer cases were diagnosed. Standa...
  20. A DNA methylation-based definition of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes.

    Molecular Oncology 9(3):555 (2015) PMID 25468711

    In cancer, epigenetic states are deregulated and thought to be of significance in cancer development and progression. We explored DNA methylation-based signatures in association with breast cancer subtypes to assess their impact on clinical presentation and patient prognosis. DNA methylation was...