1. Small-scale variations in the radiating surface of theGRB 011211jet

    New Astronomy 9(6):435 (2004)

    We report the discovery of the afterglow of the X-ray rich, long-duration γ-ray burst GRB 011211 and present evidence for oscillatory behaviour in its early optical light curve. The time-scale of the fluctuations, ∼1 h, is much smaller than the time of the observations, ∼12 h from th...
  2. A very energetic supernova associated with the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):847 (2003) PMID 12815425

    Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-the most luminous of all astronomical explosions-signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. This evidence was originally based on the probable association of one unusual GRB with a supernov...
  3. A very energetic supernova associated with the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):847 (2003) PMID 12815425

    Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-the most luminous of all astronomical explosions-signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. This evidence was originally based on the probable association of one unusual GRB with a supernov...
  4. Quantifying man-made seeing at the Nordic Optical Telescope

    New Astronomy Reviews 42(6):441 (1998)

    We present preliminary data that have enabled us to quantify local seeing effects at the Nordic Optical Telescope. The basic data are sets of time sequences of out-of-focus stellar images and simultaneously recorded values for the wind speed and direction, altitude and azimuth of the telesc...
  5. Wide-field wavefront sensing

    New Astronomy Reviews 42(6):455 (1998)

    We show that a wide-field low-order wavefront sensor in an integrating mode can be used to retrieve information about the turbulence structure of the atmosphere. In particular, the structure function for individual turbulent layers may be derived.