1. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    Nature Communications 6:7822 (2015) PMID 26215380 PMCID PMC4525174

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the fu...
  2. iBeetle-Base: a database for RNAi phenotypes in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Nucleic Acids Research 43(Database issue):D720 (2015) PMID 25378303 PMCID PMC4383896

    The iBeetle-Base (http://ibeetle-base.uni-goettingen.de) makes available annotations of RNAi phenotypes, which were gathered in a large scale RNAi screen in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (iBeetle screen). In addition, it provides access to sequence information and links for all Tribol...
  3. Sodium solute symporter and cadherin proteins act as Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba toxin functional receptors in Tribolium castaneum.

    Journal of Biological Chemistry 288(25):18013 (2013) PMID 23645668 PMCID PMC3689946

    Understanding how Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins interact with proteins in the midgut of susceptible coleopteran insects is crucial to fully explain the molecular bases of Bt specificity and insecticidal action. In this work, aminopeptidase N (TcAPN-I), E-cadherin (TcCad1), and sodium solute...
  4. A dual role for nanos and pumilio in anterior and posterior blastodermal patterning of the short-germ beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Developmental Biology 364(2):224 (2012) PMID 22326441

    Abdominal patterning in Drosophila requires the function of Nanos (nos) and Pumilio (pum) to repress posterior translation of hunchback mRNA. Here we provide the first functional analysis of nanos and pumilio genes during blastodermal patterning of a short-germ insect. We found that nos and pum ...
  5. Opposing effects of Notch-signaling in maintaining the proliferative state of follicle cells in the telotrophic ovary of the beetle Tribolium.

    Frontiers in Zoology 9(1):15 (2012) PMID 22866820 PMCID PMC3502128

    Establishment of distinct follicle cell fates at the early stages of Drosophila oogenesis is crucial for achieving proper morphology of individual egg chambers. In Drosophila oogenesis, Notch-signaling controls proliferation and differentiation of follicular cells, which eventually results in t...
  6. JAK-STAT signalling is required throughout telotrophic oogenesis and short-germ embryogenesis of the beetle Tribolium.

    Developmental Biology 350(1):169 (2011) PMID 20974121

    In Drosophila, the JAK-STAT signalling pathway regulates a broad array of developmental functions including segmentation and oogenesis. Here we analysed the functions of Tribolium JAK-STAT signalling factors and of Suppressor Of Cytokine Signalling (SOCS) orthologues, which are known to function...
  7. Apparent role of Tribolium orthodenticle in anteroposterior blastoderm patterning largely reflects novel functions in dorsoventral axis formation and cell survival.

    Development 137(11):1853 (2010) PMID 20431120

    In the short-germ beetle Tribolium castaneum, the head gap gene orthodenticle (Tc-otd) has been proposed to functionally substitute for bicoid, the anterior morphogen unique to higher dipterans. In this study we reanalyzed the function of Tc-otd. We obtained a similar range of cuticle phenotypes...
  8. An ancient anterior patterning system promotes caudal repression and head formation in ecdysozoa.

    Current Biology 19(21):1811 (2009) PMID 19818622

    Posterior expression of Caudal is required for early embryonic development in nematodes, arthropods, and vertebrates. In Drosophila, ectopic Caudal in anterior cells can induce head defects, and in Caenorhabditis the absence of Caudal in anterior embryonic cells is required for proper developmen...
  9. The genome of the model beetle and pest Tribolium castaneum.
    Stephen Richards, Richard A Gibbs, George M Weinstock, Susan J Brown, Robin Denell, Richard W Beeman, Richard Gibbs, Richard W Beeman, Susan J Brown, Gregor Bucher, Markus Friedrich, Cornelis J P Grimmelikhuijzen, Martin Klingler, Marce Lorenzen, Stephen Richards, Siegfried Roth, Reinhard Schröder, Diethard Tautz, Evgeny M Zdobnov, Donna Muzny, Richard A Gibbs, George M Weinstock, Tony Attaway, Stephanie Bell, Christian J Buhay, Mimi N Chandrabose, Dean Chavez, Kerstin P Clerk-Blankenburg, Andrew Cree, Marvin Dao, Clay Davis, Joseph Chacko, Huyen Dinh, Shannon Dugan-Rocha, Gerald Fowler, Toni Garner, Jeffrey Garnes, Andreas Gnirke, Alica Hawes, Judith Hernandez, Sandra Hines, Michael Holder, Jennifer Hume, Shalini N Jhangiani, Vandita Joshi, Ziad Mohid Khan, LaRonda Jackson, Christie Kovar, Andrea Kowis, Sandra Lee, Lora R Lewis, Jon Margolis, Margaret Morgan, Lynne V Nazareth, Ngoc Nguyen, Geoffrey Okwuonu, David Parker, Stephen Richards, San-Juana Ruiz, Jireh Santibanez, Joël Savard, Steven E Scherer, Brian Schneider, Erica Sodergren, Diethard Tautz, Selina Vattahil, Donna Villasana, Courtney S White, Rita Wright, Yoonseong Park, Richard W Beeman, Jeff Lord, Brenda Oppert, Marce Lorenzen, Susan Brown, Liangjiang Wang, Joël Savard, Diethard Tautz, Stephen Richards, George Weinstock, Richard A Gibbs, Yue Liu, Kim Worley, George Weinstock, Christine G Elsik, Justin T Reese, Eran Elhaik, Giddy Landan, Dan Graur, Peter Arensburger, Peter Atkinson, Richard W Beeman, Jim Beidler, Susan J Brown, Jeffery P Demuth, Douglas W Drury, Yu-Zhou Du, Haruhiko Fujiwara, Marce Lorenzen, Vincenza Maselli, Mizuko Osanai, Yoonseong Park, Hugh M Robertson, Zhijian Tu, Jian-jun Wang, Suzhi Wang, Stephen Richards, Henry Song, Lan Zhang, Erica Sodergren, Doreen Werner, Mario Stanke, Burkhard Morgenstern, Victor Solovyev, Peter Kosarev, Garth Brown, Hsiu-Chuan Chen, Olga Ermolaeva, Wratko Hlavina, Yuri Kapustin, Boris Kiryutin, Paul Kitts, Donna Maglott, Kim Pruitt, Victor Sapojnikov, Alexandre Souvorov, Aaron J Mackey, Robert M Waterhouse, Stefan Wyder, Evgeny M Zdobnov, Evgeny M Zdobnov, Stefan Wyder, Evgenia V Kriventseva, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki, Peer Bork, Manuel Aranda, Riyue Bao, Anke Beermann, Nicola Berns, Renata Bolognesi, François Bonneton, Daniel Bopp, Susan J Brown, Gregor Bucher, Thomas Butts, Arnaud Chaumot, Robin E Denell, David E K Ferrier, Markus Friedrich, Cassondra M Gordon, Marek Jindra, Martin Klingler, Que Lan, H Michael G Lattorff, Vincent Laudet, Cornelia von Levetsow, Zhenyi Liu, Rebekka Lutz, Jeremy A Lynch, Rodrigo Nunes da Fonseca, Nico Posnien, Rolf Reuter, Siegfried Roth, Joël Savard, Johannes B Schinko, Christian Schmitt, Michael Schoppmeier, Reinhard Schröder, Teresa D Shippy, Franck Simonnet, Henrique Marques-Souza, Diethard Tautz, Yoshinori Tomoyasu, Jochen Trauner, Maurijn Van der Zee, Michel Vervoort, Nadine Wittkopp, Ernst A Wimmer, Xiaoyun Yang, Andrew K Jones, David B Sattelle, Paul R Ebert, David Nelson, Jeffrey G Scott, Richard W Beeman, Subbaratnam Muthukrishnan, Karl J Kramer, Yasuyuki Arakane, Richard W Beeman, Qingsong Zhu, David Hogenkamp, Radhika Dixit, Brenda Oppert, Haobo Jiang, Zhen Zou, Jeremy Marshall, Elena Elpidina, Konstantin Vinokurov, Cris Oppert, Zhen Zou, Jay Evans, Zhiqiang Lu, Picheng Zhao, Niranji Sumathipala, Boran Altincicek, Andreas Vilcinskas, Michael Williams, Dan Hultmark, Charles Hetru, Haobo Jiang, Cornelis J P Grimmelikhuijzen, Frank Hauser, Giuseppe Cazzamali, Michael Williamson, Yoonseong Park, Bin Li, Yoshiaki Tanaka, Reinhard Predel, Susanne Neupert, Joachim Schachtner, Peter Verleyen, Florian Raible, Peer Bork, Markus Friedrich, Kimberly O Walden, Hugh M Robertson, Sergio Angeli, Sylvain Forêt, Gregor Bucher, Stefan Schuetz, Ryszard Maleszka, Ernst A Wimmer, Richard W Beeman, Marce Lorenzen, Yoshinori Tomoyasu, Sherry C Miller, Daniela Grossmann, and Gregor Bucher

    Nature 452(7190):949 (2008) PMID 18362917

    Tribolium castaneum is a member of the most species-rich eukaryotic order, a powerful model organism for the study of generalized insect development, and an important pest of stored agricultural products. We describe its genome sequence here. This omnivorous beetle has evolved the ability to int...
  10. Whole-mount in situ hybridization of spider embryos.

    PMID 21356699

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American wandering spider, is a particularly useful laboratory model for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmen...
  11. Detection of Cell Death in Spider Embryos Using TUNEL.

    PMID 21356700

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American Wandering Spider, is a particularly useful laboratory model for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmen...
  12. The American Wandering Spider Cupiennius salei.

    PMID 21356686

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei is a useful laboratory model for embryological and physiological studies. Its highly developed sensory organs also make it an excellent model for behavioral studies. Furthermore, Cupiennius has contributed greatly to the study of evolutionary developmental...
  13. Detection of Cell Proliferation in Spider Embryos Using BrdU Labeling.

    PMID 21356702

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American wandering spider, is particularly useful for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmentation, appendage d...
  14. Dissecting spider embryos for light microscopy.

    PMID 21356703

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American wandering spider, is a particularly useful laboratory model for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmen...
  15. Exploring systemic RNA interference in insects: a genome-wide survey for RNAi genes in Tribolium.

    Genome Biology 9(1):R10 (2008) PMID 18201385

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly conserved cellular mechanism. In some organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically. Some insects also exhibit a systemic RNAi response. However, Drosophila, the leading insect model organism, does not show a robu...
  16. Collection and fixation of spider embryos.

    PMID 21356698

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American wandering spider, is a particularly useful laboratory model for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmen...
  17. Gene Silencing via Embryonic RNAi in Spider Embryos.

    PMID 21356701

    INTRODUCTIONThe spider Cupiennius salei, commonly known as the American wandering spider, is a particularly useful laboratory model for embryological studies because of the availability of tools to study and manipulate its embryonic development. Cupiennius is used to study axis formation, segmen...
  18. Duplicated Hox genes in the spider Cupiennius salei.

    Frontiers in Zoology 4:10 (2007) PMID 17355624 PMCID PMC1838909

    Hox genes are expressed in specific domains along the anterior posterior body axis and define the regional identity. In most animals these genes are organized in a single cluster in the genome and the order of the genes in the cluster is correlated with the anterior to posterior expression of th...
  19. Maternal torso signaling controls body axis elongation in a short germ insect.

    Current Biology 15(23):2131 (2005) PMID 16332539

    In the long germ insect Drosophila, all body segments are determined almost simultaneously at the blastoderm stage under the control of the anterior, the posterior, and the terminal genetic system . Most other arthropods (and similarly also vertebrates) develop more slowly as short germ embryos,...
  20. Suppressor of Hairless and Presenilin phenotypes imply involvement of canonical Notch-signalling in segmentation of the spider Cupiennius salei.

    Developmental Biology 280(1):211 (2005) PMID 15766760

    Arthropods, vertebrates, and annelids all have a segmented body. Our recent discovery of involvement of Notch-signalling in spider segmentation revived the discussion on the origin of segmented body plans and suggests the sharing of a common genetic program in a common ancestor. Here, we analyse...