1. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    Nature 518(7537):74 (2015) PMID 25561176

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astr...
  2. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    Nature 518(7537):74 (2015) PMID 25561176

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astr...
  3. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    Nature 518(7537):74 (2015) PMID 25561176

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astr...
  4. A possible close supermassive black-hole binary in a quasar with optical periodicity.

    Nature 518(7537):74 (2015) PMID 25561176

    Quasars have long been known to be variable sources at all wavelengths. Their optical variability is stochastic and can be due to a variety of physical mechanisms; it is also well-described statistically in terms of a damped random walk model. The recent availability of large collections of astr...
  5. The bright optical afterglow of the nearby gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):844 (2003) PMID 12815424

    Past studies of cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been hampered by their extreme distances, resulting in faint afterglows. A nearby GRB could potentially shed much light on the origin of these events, but GRBs with a redshift z
  6. The bright optical afterglow of the nearby gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    Nature 423(6942):844 (2003) PMID 12815424

    Past studies of cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been hampered by their extreme distances, resulting in faint afterglows. A nearby GRB could potentially shed much light on the origin of these events, but GRBs with a redshift z
  7. A molecular Einstein ring: imaging a starburst disk surrounding a quasi-stellar object.

    Science 300(5620):773 (2003) PMID 12677071

    Images of the molecular CO 2-1 line emission and the radio continuum emission from the redshift 4.12 gravitationally lensed quasi-stellar object (QSO) PSS J2322+1944 reveal an Einstein ring with a diameter of 1.5". These observations are modeled as a star-forming disk surrounding the QSO nucleus...
  8. A molecular Einstein ring: imaging a starburst disk surrounding a quasi-stellar object.

    Science 300(5620):773 (2003) PMID 12677071

    Images of the molecular CO 2-1 line emission and the radio continuum emission from the redshift 4.12 gravitationally lensed quasi-stellar object (QSO) PSS J2322+1944 reveal an Einstein ring with a diameter of 1.5". These observations are modeled as a star-forming disk surrounding the QSO nucleus...
  9. Early optical emission from the gamma-ray burst of 4 October 2002.

    Nature 422(6929):284 (2003) PMID 12646914

    Observations of the long-lived emission--or 'afterglow'--of long-duration gamma-ray bursts place them at cosmological distances, but the origin of these energetic explosions remains a mystery. Observations of optical emission contemporaneous with the burst of gamma-rays should provide insight in...
  10. Early optical emission from the gamma-ray burst of 4 October 2002.

    Nature 422(6929):284 (2003) PMID 12646914

    Observations of the long-lived emission--or 'afterglow'--of long-duration gamma-ray bursts place them at cosmological distances, but the origin of these energetic explosions remains a mystery. Observations of optical emission contemporaneous with the burst of gamma-rays should provide insight in...