1. Biology in the Anthropocene: Challenges and insights from young fossil records.

    PNAS 112(16):4922 (2015) PMID 25901315 PMCID PMC4413286

    With overwhelming evidence of change in habitats, biologists today must assume that few, if any, study areas are natural and that biological variability is superimposed on trends rather than stationary means. Paleobiological data from the youngest sedimentary record, including death assemblages ...
  2. The effects of temporal resolution on species turnover and on testing metacommunity models.

    American Naturalist 175(5):587 (2010) PMID 20302427

    Patterns of low temporal turnover in species composition found within paleoecological time series contrast with the high turnover predicted by neutral metacommunity models and thus have been used to support nonneutral models. However, these predictions assume temporal resolution on the scale of ...
  3. Discordance between living and death assemblages as evidence for anthropogenic ecological change.

    PNAS 104(45):17701 (2007) PMID 17965231 PMCID PMC2077045

    Mismatches between the composition of a time-averaged death assemblage (dead remains sieved from the upper mixed-zone of the sedimentary column) and the local living community are typically attributed to natural postmortem processes. However, statistical analysis of 73 molluscan data sets from e...
  4. Depletion, degradation, and recovery potential of estuaries and coastal seas.

    Science 312(5781):1806 (2006) PMID 16794081

    Estuarine and coastal transformation is as old as civilization yet has dramatically accelerated over the past 150 to 300 years. Reconstructed time lines, causes, and consequences of change in 12 once diverse and productive estuaries and coastal seas worldwide show similar patterns: Human impacts...
  5. Shell composition has no net impact on large-scale evolutionary patterns in mollusks.

    Science 307(5711):914 (2005) PMID 15705849

    A major suspected bias in the fossil record of skeletonized groups is variation in preservability owing to differences in shell composition. However, despite extensive changes in shell composition over the 500-million-year history of marine bivalves, genus duration and shell composition show few...