1. Apes in the Anthropocene: flexibility and survival.

    Trends in Ecology & Evolution 30(4):215 (2015) PMID 25766059

    We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how great apes behave in natural contexts, the impact of human activities must i...
  2. Snakes as hazards: modelling risk by chasing chimpanzees.

    Primates 56(2):107 (2015) PMID 25600837

    Snakes are presumed to be hazards to primates, including humans, by the snake detection hypothesis (Isbell in J Hum Evol 51:1-35, 2006; Isbell, The fruit, the tree, and the serpent. Why we see so well, 2009). Quantitative, systematic data to test this idea are lacking for the behavioural ecology...
  3. Grips and hand movements of chimpanzees during feeding in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology 156(3):317 (2015) PMID 25363236

    It has long been assumed that stone tool making was a major factor in the evolution of derived hominin hand morphology. However, stresses on the hand associated with food retrieval and processing also have been recognized as relevant early hominin behaviors that should be investigated. To this e...
  4. Grips and hand movements of chimpanzees during feeding in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    American Journal of Physical Anthropology 156(3):317 (2015) PMID 25363236

    It has long been assumed that stone tool making was a major factor in the evolution of derived hominin hand morphology. However, stresses on the hand associated with food retrieval and processing also have been recognized as relevant early hominin behaviors that should be investigated. To this e...
  5. Chimpanzees prey on army ants at Seringbara, Nimba Mountains, Guinea: Predation patterns and tool use characteristics.

    American Journal of Primatology 77(3):319 (2015) PMID 25315798

    Chimpanzees are renowned for their use of foraging tools in harvesting social insects and some populations use tools to prey on aggressive army ants (Dorylus spp.). Tool use in army ant predation varies across chimpanzee study sites with differences in tool length, harvesting technique, and army...
  6. Chimpanzees prey on army ants at Seringbara, Nimba Mountains, Guinea: Predation patterns and tool use characteristics.

    American Journal of Primatology 77(3):319 (2015) PMID 25315798

    Chimpanzees are renowned for their use of foraging tools in harvesting social insects and some populations use tools to prey on aggressive army ants (Dorylus spp.). Tool use in army ant predation varies across chimpanzee study sites with differences in tool length, harvesting technique, and army...
  7. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and their mammalian sympatriates: Mt. Assirik, Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal.

    Primates 55(4):525 (2014) PMID 24990446

    In intact, mosaic ecosystems, chimpanzees are sympatric with a wide range of other mammals, which may be predators, prey, or competitors. We delve beyond the nominal data of species lists to interval-level data on 35 medium-bodied and large-bodied mammals encountered at a hot, dry, and open fiel...
  8. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and their mammalian sympatriates: Mt. Assirik, Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal.

    Primates 55(4):525 (2014) PMID 24990446

    In intact, mosaic ecosystems, chimpanzees are sympatric with a wide range of other mammals, which may be predators, prey, or competitors. We delve beyond the nominal data of species lists to interval-level data on 35 medium-bodied and large-bodied mammals encountered at a hot, dry, and open fiel...
  9. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    American Journal of Primatology 76(6):539 (2014) PMID 24482001

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods...
  10. The 'other faunivory' revisited: Insectivory in human and non-human primates and the evolution of human diet.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:4 (2014) PMID 24560030

    The role of invertebrates in the evolution of human diet has been under-studied by comparison with vertebrates and plants. This persists despite substantial knowledge of the importance of the 'other faunivory', especially insect-eating, in the daily lives of non-human primates and traditional hu...
  11. Primates, insects and insect resources.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:1 (2014) PMID 24703185

  12. Selective insectivory at Toro-Semliki, Uganda: comparative analyses suggest no 'savanna' chimpanzee pattern.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:20 (2014) PMID 24792877

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) insectivory across Africa is ubiquitous. Insects provide a significant nutritional payoff and may be important for chimpanzees in dry, open habitats with narrow diets. We tested this hypothesis at Semliki, Uganda, a long-term dry study site. We evaluated prospects fo...
  13. Primates, insects and insect resources.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:1 (2014) PMID 24703185

  14. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    American Journal of Primatology 76(6):539 (2014) PMID 24482001

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods...
  15. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    American Journal of Primatology 76(6):539 (2014) PMID 24482001

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods...
  16. Selective insectivory at Toro-Semliki, Uganda: comparative analyses suggest no 'savanna' chimpanzee pattern.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:20 (2014) PMID 24792877

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) insectivory across Africa is ubiquitous. Insects provide a significant nutritional payoff and may be important for chimpanzees in dry, open habitats with narrow diets. We tested this hypothesis at Semliki, Uganda, a long-term dry study site. We evaluated prospects fo...
  17. The 'other faunivory' revisited: Insectivory in human and non-human primates and the evolution of human diet.

    Journal of Human Evolution 71:4 (2014) PMID 24560030

    The role of invertebrates in the evolution of human diet has been under-studied by comparison with vertebrates and plants. This persists despite substantial knowledge of the importance of the 'other faunivory', especially insect-eating, in the daily lives of non-human primates and traditional hu...
  18. Introduction to the evolution of human handedness.

    Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New ... 1288:v (2013) PMID 23742685

  19. Handedness is more than laterality: lessons from chimpanzees.

    Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New ... 1288:1 (2013) PMID 23601007

    Is human handedness unique? That is, do our nearest living relations, chimpanzee and bonobo (Pan spp.) show species-wide handedness, as is seen in living Homo sapiens? The answer may depend on definition: Handedness (congruence across subjects and across tasks) should be distinguished from hand ...
  20. Handedness is more than laterality: lessons from chimpanzees.

    Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New ... 1288:1 (2013) PMID 23601007

    Is human handedness unique? That is, do our nearest living relations, chimpanzee and bonobo (Pan spp.) show species-wide handedness, as is seen in living Homo sapiens? The answer may depend on definition: Handedness (congruence across subjects and across tasks) should be distinguished from hand ...