Contact Dermatitis

Print ISSN
0105-1873
Electronic ISSN
1600-0536
Impact factor
3.672
Publisher
wiley
URL
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0536
Usage rank
2357
Article count
8470
Free count
169
Free percentage
0.0199528
PDFs via platforms
Wiley from 1975, Rcgp, CSA, Ovid, Ingenta, Gale, and Proquest

  1. Are concomitant patch test reactions to epoxy resin and BIS-GMA indicative of cross-reactivity?

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):376 (2007) PMID 17988287

    Despite rare simultaneous exposure, concomitant sensitisation to bisphenol A diglycidyl methacrylate (BIS-GMA) and epoxy resin frequently occurs. Immunological cross-reactivity has not been proven by animal experiments so far. Our objective was to examine cross-reactivity epidemiologically by an...
  2. Occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis from methacrylates in a dental nurse.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):371 (2007) PMID 17988286

    There are very few reports of airborne allergic contact dermatitis from methacrylates. To report a dental nurse with facial eczema supposedly caused by airborne methacrylates present in the work environment. Patch testing with serial dilutions of several methacrylates and work provocations in en...
  3. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to platinum, palladium, and gold.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):382 (2007) PMID 17988289

  4. Photoallergic reaction to systemic quinine sulphate.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):384 (2007) PMID 17988291

  5. Contact dermatitis to triclosan in toothpaste.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):383 (2007) PMID 17988290

  6. Systemic contact allergy to corticosteroids revisited.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):386 (2007) PMID 17988292

  7. 1,2-benzisothiazolin-3-one in disposable polyvinyl chloride gloves for medical use.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):365 (2007) PMID 17988285

    Benzisothiazolinone is used as a slimicide in the manufacture of disposable powder-free polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves. We recently reported 6 patients from dentistry and health care probably sensitized to benzisothiazolinone in PVC gloves. The study aimed to investigate how widely disposable P...
  8. Lack of evidence for allergenic properties of coumarin in a fragrance allergy mouse model.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):361 (2007) PMID 17988284

    There is controversy as to whether coumarin, an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances, is a contact allergen involved in fragrance allergy. We recently showed that the purity of coumarin is a critical parameter for its allergenicity because coumarin preparations containing trace amounts of cont...
  9. An update on airborne contact dermatitis: 2001-2006.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):353 (2007) PMID 17988283

    Reports on airborne dermatoses are mainly published in the context of occupational settings. Hence, in recent years, dermatologists and also occupational physicians have become increasingly aware of the airborne source of contact dermatitis, resulting mainly from exposure to irritants or allerge...
  10. Photoallergic contact dermatitis from lavender oil in topical ketoprofen.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(6):381 (2007) PMID 17988288

  11. Tumour necrotizing factor-alpha promoter and GST-T1 genotype predict skin allergy to chromate in cement workers in Taiwan.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):309 (2007) PMID 17937745

    Construction workers exposed to cement are known to suffer from occupational contact dermatitis because of chromate sensitization. It is not clear whether certain genotypes are associated with increased susceptibility of chromate sensitization in those workers regularly exposed to cement. The ob...
  12. Cellular dynamics in the draining lymph nodes during sensitization and elicitation phases of contact hypersensitivity.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):300 (2007) PMID 17937744

    The different role of various immunological effector cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is receiving increased attention. During the past decade, the involvement of different cell types in CHS has been investigated by the use of antibody-induced depletion of specific subtypes of immunologic...
  13. Contact dermatitis as a result of Urginea maritima.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):343 (2007) PMID 17937751

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by poly(adipic acid-co-1,2-propylene glycol) and di-(n-octyl) tin-bis(2-ethylhexylmaleate) in vinyl chloride gloves.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):349 (2007) PMID 17937757

  15. Allergic contact dermatitis from ethylcyanoacrylate in an office worker with artificial nails led to months of sick leave.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):346 (2007) PMID 17937754

  16. The validity of rating patch test reactions based on digital images.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):337 (2007) PMID 17937750

    The proper reading of patch test (PT) reactions, based on morphological criteria, is of utmost importance. Digital images are increasingly used for medical training. To assess the diagnostic validity of readings of 20 digital images of various PT reaction grades by congress attendants. 122 volun...
  17. The epidemiology of contact allergy in the general population--prevalence and main findings.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):287 (2007) PMID 17937743

    A substantial number of studies have investigated the prevalence of contact allergy in the general population and in unselected subgroups of the general population. The aim of this review was to determine a median prevalence and summarize the main findings from studies on contact allergy in the ...
  18. Allergic contact dermatitis to methyl aminolevulinate after photodynamic therapy in 9 patients.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):321 (2007) PMID 17937747

    This report describes 9 patients who developed allergic contact dermatitis to methyl aminolevulinate used for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The risk of developing contact allergy to methyl aminolevulinate in PDT treated patients was calculated to 1% after an average of 7 treatments (range 2-21).
  19. Retention of allergic potential of parthenium following composting.

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):348 (2007) PMID 17937756

  20. Are material safety data sheets (MSDS) useful in the diagnosis and management of occupational contact dermatitis?

    Contact Dermatitis 57(5):331 (2007) PMID 17937749

    This study assesses both the success of medical practitioners in accessing hazardous substances' information from product manufacturers and the accuracy and clinical usefulness of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) presented by workers with suspected occupational contact dermatitis (OCD). 100 co...