Advanced search×
×

NeuroImage

Print ISSN
1053-8119
Electronic ISSN
1095-9572
Impact factor
5.937
Publisher
Sciencedirect
URL
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/10538119
Usage rank
152
Article count
8596
Free count
326
Free percentage
0.0379246
PDFs via platforms
Proquest, Gale, Rcgp, Sciencedirect from 1992, Ingenta, and CSA

  1. Compartment-model based quantification of beta-amyloid binding with Florbetaben PET inAlzheimer'sdisease and control subjects

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  2. Correlation between FEPPA uptake and microglia activation in 6-OHDA injured rat brain

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  3. Microglia activation in schizophrenia
    , Bossong, and

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  4. Dopamine transmission in comorbid schizophrenia and substance dependence

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  5. Parkinson's disease, impulse control disorder and the D3 dopamine receptor system: Preliminary PET imaging studies with [11C](+)PHNO compari...

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  6. Glucose metabolism in medial prefrontal cortex is associated with serotonin 1A receptor binding in female marmosets

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  7. The role of dopamine in sustained attention: Imaging the effects of methylphenidate in ADHD patients and healthy controls
    , Fryer, and Muller

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  8. Evaluation of occupancy of cannabinoid CB1 receptors by a novel antagonist drug with [11C]OMAR and PET

    NeuroImage 52:0 (2010)

  9. WITHDRAWN: Erratum to “Does function follow form?: Methods to fuse structural and functional brain images show decreased linkage in schizoph...

    NeuroImage (2010) PMID 21134492

    This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy. Copyright © 2...
  10. fMRI Contrast at High and Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields: Insight from Complementary Methods

    NeuroImage (2010)

    Our results showed that, besides the normal T2-weighted BOLD contribution that arises in spin-echo sequences, fMRI SPEN signals contain a strong component caused by apparent T1-related effects, demonstrating the potential of such technique for exploring functional activation in rodents and on humans...